Enhanced nutrition to reduce child mortality ? (IPS)

Read at : IPS NEWS

http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/06/malnutrition-still-killing-three-million-children-under-five/

Malnutrition Still Killing Three Million Children Under Five

UNITED NATIONS, Jun 6 2013 (IPS) – Kevin’s Carter’s disturbing picture of the 1993 famine in Sudan won him a Pulitzer Prize.

The image of an emaciated child being watched by a vulture was etched into the world’s memory forever, drawing attention to conditions where survival becomes the only priority.

Reducing the child mortality rate and improving maternal health prominently figure in the list of the U.N.’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were adopted by the international community in 2000 in New York with a 2015 deadline.

As the world body draws up a list of new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the medical journal The Lancet published a series of reports Wednesday finding that,among other things, malnutrition is responsible for nearly half (45 percent) of all deaths in children under five.

Around three million deaths of children under five occur from malnutrition, which encompasses undernutrition and overweight, both global problems.

The focus of agricultural programmes should shift towards enhanced nutrition rather than just increasing crop yields, Professor Robert Black of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health told IPS.

“These programmes have not been set up in an ideal way,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/06/malnutrition-still-killing-three-million-children-under-five/#sthash.Ni7vHWkq.dpuf

Fresh food to combat child malnutrition can easily be grown in small spaces with almost no costs in re-used bottles, pots, buckets or sacks, tiered in towers (Photo WVC)

Fresh food to combat child malnutrition can easily be grown in small spaces with almost no costs, in re-used bottles, pots, buckets or sacks, tiered in towers.  This is sustainable food aid versus non-sustainable enhanced nutrition. (Photo WVC)

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About Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.
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