IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 36

 

agriculture-food-and-nutrition-for-africa

Agriculture, food and nutrition for Africa (FAO 1997)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 36

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1k9HOxwdFv-awCjpq1_QTGskYLYWV8V0NY5623Ob4G1g/edit?usp=sharing

or see agriculture-food-and-nutrition-for-africa-fao-1997

IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 35

 

prospects-of-saline-agriculture-in-the-arabian-peninsula

 

Prospects of Saline Agriculture in the Arabian Peninsula (2004)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 35

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1C1vPXJXOwVBcEhZxO2vO1IZk22CxOjwQFYf16ulG-6w/edit?usp=sharing

or see prospects-of-saline-agriculture-in-the-arabian-peninsula-2004

Smallholder farmers and sustainable agricultural technologies

 

 

Boost for Africa’s smallholder farmers’ access to sustainable agricultural technologies as USAID announces $ 50 million Africa RISING Phase 2

by

The U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Bureau for Food Security in Washington DC has announced funding for a second 5-year phase of the Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING) program beginning October 2016. Funded through the agency’s Feed the Future initiative the second phase of Africa RISING will focus on ensuring farming communities within target feed the future zones of influence in Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania, Ghana and Mali get access to the best-bet/best-fit improved farming practices identified by the project’s research team during the first phase of the project.

“Farmers need access to improved agricultural technologies that have gone through an iterative research process to establish suitability and quality if they are to sustainably optimize the productivity of their farms in a way that lets them benefit from existing and future markets and add value to their crops and herds. This is the goal we aim to achieve through programs like Africa RISING that will now in this new phase have significant focus on ensuring farmers get their hands on improved technologies that have gone through this process,” said Jerry Glover, the USAID Bureau for Food Security’s Senior Sustainable Agriculture Advisor.

The goal of the Africa RISING program is to create opportunities for smallholder  farm households to move out of hunger and poverty through sustainably intensified farming systems that improve food, nutrition, and income security, particularly for women and children, and conserve or enhance the natural resource base. The program which brings together over 100 research and development organizations teaming up to achieve this goal is led by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (in West Africa and East and Southern Africa) and the International Livestock Research Institute (in the Ethiopian Highlands). The International Food Policy Research Institute leads the evaluation and impact assessment.

Read the full article: Africa Rising

Fostering food and nutrition security is key to sustainable development

 

 

Food and nutrition security key to Africa’s development

by Gilbert Nakweya bb9e69386f2d71ee1687c3e38927b131

Fostering food and nutrition security is key to sustainable development. But access to high quality seeds from research and development by smallholder farmers is still a major challenge to agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

In fact, the second goal in the UN’s Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development Goal is to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

But how much is Africa investing to improve food security? Is Africa committed to taking leadership in building resilient seed sector for improved food security? Th

Africa requires a continental effort in development of sustainable seed sector through leadership.

Gilbert Nakweya

ese were some of the issues I pondered over during the Integrated Seed Sector Development (ISSD) Africa Synthesis Conference in Kenya this week (19-20 September). The conference drew agricultural experts from all over the world to discuss the findings of ISSD Africa’s two year pilot project that ends this year.

Read the full article: SciDevNet

Four different plant species planted together for optimal crop and soil performance.

 

Photo credit: Science Daily

Chris Pelzer, Ann Bybee-Finley, and Casey McManus (L-R) clean up the edges of a cowpea plot about 30 days after planting the first field site for the experiment. Four different plant species are planted together in a team effort to diversify and add nutrients to the soil.
Credit: Sustainable Cropping Systems Lab

Intercropping: Intersection of soil health, production

Cornell University.

Date:
September 21, 2016
Source:
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA)
Summary:
Plant diversity in intercropping leads to more diversity below ground too. Researchers are working to find the right combination for optimal crop and soil performance.

Read the full article: Science Daily

Climate change, land use and global food demand.

 

Photo credit: * Containers in greenhouse – veggies – Photo Lemuel A. Molina – 282925_524481317575915_1703501653_n.jpg

Climate change means land use will need to change to keep up with global food demand, say scientists

Date:
September 20, 2016
Source:
University of Birmingham
Summary:
Without significant improvements in technology, global crop yields are likely to fall in the areas currently used for production of the world’s three major cereal crops, forcing production to move to new areas, new research suggests.

Read the full article: Science Daily

Journal Reference:

  1. T.A.M. Pugh, C. Müller, J. Elliott, D. Deryng, C. Folberth, S. Olin, E. Schmid, A. Arneth. Climate analogues suggest limited potential for intensification of production on current croplands under climate change. Nature Communications, 2016; 7: 12608 DOI:10.1038/ncomms12608

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MY COMMENT (Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM, University of Ghent, Belgium)

It would be very interesting if research could be set up on the possible role to be played by CONTAINER GARDENING in the global food demand within the framework of climate change.

To what extend could “container gardening” contribute to food security for hungry families ?

A suggestion for the interested colleagues ?

Container gardening in every work plan for combatting malnutrition in the next decade.

 

MALNUTRITION AND CONTAINER GARDENING

by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

(University of Ghent, Belgium)

 

On Sept. 20, 2016, FAO’s Director-General José Graziano da Silva addressed the United Nations General Assembly celebrating the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition. and said:

“The 10 years running until 2025 will be a critical time for action to build healthy and sustainable food systems and end malnutrition in all its forms. The purpose of the Decade of Action on Nutrition is to continue to draw the world`s attention to the importance of combatting malnutrition”.

riser2-jojo-rom-285968_2051946656569_1181604134_31935796_8041270_o
Jojo ROM and his family (Davao City, The Philippines) harvesting a daily portion of fresh vegetables and herbs at the riser in his small backyard. All is growing in different types of containers (bottles, tetrapots, etc.) – Photo Jojo Rom 285968_2051946656569_1181604134_31935796_8041270_o.jpg

Knowing that CONTAINER GARDENING is one of the most effective tools for combatting malnutrition at home and in schools, the 71.000 members of this group are wondering if container gardening is really a part of the work plan of WHO and FAO, focusing their efforts on two main objectives: “One is assisting governments in building national policies and programs that advance nutrition. The other is to align the efforts of existing global initiatives and social movements towards common goals. To support concrete action on nutrition programs, both agencies will further organize special meetings to strengthen countries’ technical capacities to tackle new nutrition challenges”.

Am I blind or have I missed container gardening somewhere ?

pool-lettuce-photo-sonia-alejandra-gauthier-483968_4316875042333_1291165749_n
Juicy lettuce growing in a kiddle pool, but it can also been growing in any container (pot, bottle, bag, sack, drum, tower of bottles or buckets, etc. – Photo Sonia Alejandra Gauthier – 483968_4316875042333_1291165749_n.jpg

It remains good to know that more and people on all continents are growing fresh food for daily consumption in a panoply of containers. It is a recognisable signal for governments and international aid organizations that this is the most direct road to solving the malnutrition problem, particularly for children.