IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 27

 

Good Practices in Drylands Management

Good Practices in Drylands Management (1999)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 27

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GzJfx_fauz-JtkvPRqiSEuiC0CqdCyQb7yVhCFixuSQ/edit?usp=sharing

or see Good Practices in Drylands Management

IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 26

 

Rural Poverty Report 2001

Rural Poverty Report 2001 (IFAD)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 26

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UVirM06lMMPYidl4Izk6xwcdVSwmtNNxPOhOYELy9wI/edit?usp=sharing

or see Rural poverty Report 2001

Pumping untapped groundwater

 

 

The Guardian: Africa droughts prompt calls to start pumping untapped groundwater

The Guardian recently published an article covering theGroundwater Solutions Initiative for Policy and Practice (GRIPP) co-led by IWMI. The article also quotes IWMI Director General Jeremy Bird.

……….

Read the full article: Africa droughts prompt calls to start pumping untapped groundwater.

See IWMI

How desertification has turned into a monstrous challenge for Africa

 

Photo credit: Down to Earth

In Africa, desertification is said to be happening at an estimated 20,000 hectares per year

Desertification in Africa: 10 things you must know

Those who live off the land cannot afford to see their future go dry. Desertification has triggered displacements across the world. Each year, millions of hectares of land are lost. According to the UN agencies, land degradation affects 1.5 billion people globally. Their reports reveal how desertification has turned into a monstrous challenge for Africa:

  • Dry lands cover 65 per cent of the continent. One-third of this area is hyper-arid deserts and completely uninhabited, except in oases. The remaining two-thirds of the dry lands, which comprise arid and semi-arid lands, are home to about 400 million Africans.
  • Africa also suffers from inherently low soil fertility as the bedrock consists of granites and gneiss. Most of the soils in Africa are characterised by a low proportion of clay, making them easy to work and also easy to lose.
  • Every year, Africa loses about 280 million tonnes of cereal crops from about 105 million hectares of croplands. This can be prevented if soil erosion is curbed.
  • Poverty-related agricultural practices are a major contributor to desertification. Continuous cultivation without adding supplements, overgrazing, lack of soil and water conservation structures, and indiscriminate bushfires aggravate the process of desertification.
  • Read the full story: Down to Earth

GGW, a simple plan to combat a complex problem. There were just a few problems.

 

Photo credit: Smithsonian

An aerial view of agroforestry management practices in Niger in 2004. (USGS)

The “Great Green Wall” Didn’t Stop Desertification, but it Evolved Into Something That Might

The multibillion-dollar effort to plant a 4,000-mile-long wall of trees hit some snags along the way, but there’s still hope

SMITHSONIAN.COM
africa_firewood.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_upscale
Women spend less time retrieving firewood when trees are nearer to their land. (Chris Reij) – http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/5e/ee/5eeeca66-3d77-456e-8a4f-323c19204544/africa_firewood.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_upscale.jpg

IT was a simple plan to combat a complex problem. The plan: plant a Great Green Wall of trees 10 miles wide and 4,350 miles long, bisecting a dozen countries from Senegal in the west to Djibouti in the east. The problem: the creeping desertification across Africa.

“The desert is a spreading cancer,” Abdoulaye Wade, Senegal’s president and the wall’s standard bearer, said. “We must fight it. That is why we have decided to join in this titanic battle.”

There were just a few problems.

Planting trees across the Sahel, the arid savanna on the south border of the Sahara Desert, had no chance to succeed. There was little funding. There was no science suggesting it would work. Moreover, the desert was not actually moving south; instead, overuse was denuding the land. Large chunks of the proposed “wall” were uninhabited, meaning no one would be there to care for the saplings.

Read the full article: Smithsonian

When will every school in developing countries have a school garden ?

 

 

Back to School: Local school gardens help kids

There are several school gardens in the Marathon County area and it could be helping your kids more than you think. The National Gardening Association found that school gardens will help students eat more fruits and vegetables and improve their social skills by working with others.

The Hatley Elementary School and Community Garden has expanded over past couple of years and more recently the school received a grant to purchase a green house helping kids like Caleb Breyton even more.

“I like to pull weeds and I like to pick the plants,” said Caleb Breyton in the garden.

The fifth grader works hard as he gets his knees and hands dirty while picking green beans and other veggies. Caleb not only likes to garden, but enjoys eating the growing plants too. Since being in the garden he says he has eaten more veggies and found a new produce he loves, which is kale.

The 4th graders start by growing seeds in the green house and then in June students will move what they’ve grown into the garden. All grades K-5 will work with the produce. It’s something Fischer says helps them learn even more than staying in the classroom.

Read the full article: WSAW