Planting trees in Mongolia

 

Photo credit: Travel Daily News Asia

Korean Air to plant trees in Mongolia to prevent desertification

Theodore Koumelis

From May 15th to 26th, more than 200 Korean Air employees will be cooperating with 600 local residents to plant trees in Mongolia.

Hong Kong – Korean Air has been taking the lead in saving the Earth by volunteering for 14 consecutive years to plant trees in Mongolia.

From May 15th to 26th, more than 200 Korean Air employees will be cooperating with 600 local residents to plant trees in Mongolia. This activity is part of Korean Air’s ‘Global Planting Project‘ which aims to prevent desertification of the city and save the environment. What was once a deserted area now has more than 110,000 trees planted and has been renamed ‘Korean Air Forest‘. The forest is located at Baganuur, a city 150 kilometers east of Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia.

Mongolia Global Planting Project ‘Korean Air Forest’ covers an area of 440,000 square meters and consists mainly of poplar trees, sea buckthorn and Siberian elms. The fruits of the sea buckthorn are used as ingredients of vitamin drinks. Thus planting trees not only makes the city greener but also contributes to increasing the incomes of local residents. The airline is focused on maintaining the forest well and has hired a local professional to look after it and to train local residents in supervision.

Read the full article: Travel Daily News AsiaTravel Daily News Asia

International Summit of non-state actors on land degradation and climate change

 

rolandries

This Summit will be a stimulating and unprecedented moment to share experiences; and a collective and concrete act to refuse the fatality of climate.”

Roland Ries, Co-President of UCLG and Mayor of Strasbourg

International Summit of non-state actors on desertification

In partnership with the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Climate Chance association, Mr. Roland Ries, Co-President of UCLG and Mayor of Strasbourg, will host the International Summit of non-state actors on land degradation and climate change in local territories “Désertif’actions”, on 27 and 28 June 2017.  

One year after the adoption of the 2030 Development Agenda and the Paris Agreement on Climate, the challenges of food security, forced migrations, international security and stability are being made worse by the intensification of land degradation, climate phenomena and multiple inappropriate practices that increase pressure on land.

The Summit will aim to demonstrate the engagement of non-state actors, including local authorities and civil society, to adapt to climate change and discuss initiatives led at the local level addressing the sustainable management of land and the development of territories, starting with target 15.3 of the 2030 Development Agenda on land degradation neutrality.

The summit will bring together 300 non-state actors and the outcome of the Summit will be brought to COP13 on Desertification and COP23 on Climate Change. The event will include the presence of the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) – to be confirmed – and the Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Read the full article: CITIES

The important link between land degradation and migration.

 

2017_WDCD

Events: 17/06/2017

 

In just 15 years, the number of international migrants worldwide has risen from 173 million in 2000 to 244 million in 2015.[1]

Environmental degradation, political instability, food insecurity and poverty are causes of migration and development challenges.

The 2017 World Day to Combat Desertification (#2017WDCD) will examine the important link between land degradation and migration.

#2017WDCD will look at specific ways local communities can build resilience against current multi-fold development challenges through sustainable land management practices.  This day should remind everyone of land’s important role in producing food and generating local employment, as well as its ability to add to the sustainability, stability and security of desertification-affected places.

The global observance of #2017WDCD will be on 15 June in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The day will be hosted by le Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Economie Verte et du Changement Climatique (MEEVCC).

Get involved and celebrate 2017 WDCD with us

Go to the online campaign page!

Further Resources

The UNCCD Secretariat will upload information materials to aid your celebration as they become available.

For further information, contact: WDCD2017@unccd.int

 

Free #2017WDCD videos

  • 27-minute film on the Day’s theme is available for use by television stations in English and French.
  • 3-minute film trailer for social media
  • 10-minute version for screening at your event is also available.

Inquiries should be sent to wwischnewski@unccd.int.

 

The UNCCD Secretariat wants to promote your event!

Want the UNCCD Secretariat to promote your #2017WDCD celebration?

Send your event plans to WDCD2017@unccd.int .

 

To request further information, such as WDCD messages from United Nations officials or press releases in additional languages, as well as past campaign, press or awareness raising materials, please contact secretariat@unccd.int .

A discovery that could help the fight against climate change and desertification.

 

Photo credit: The World Bank

Satellites find “hidden forests” helping fight against global warming

Future Policy Award 2017: Desertification

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https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/

Future Policy Award 2017: Evaluation process started!

We must not let our future dry out! This year we are celebrating the world’s best laws and policies to combat desertification, among the most pressing challenges of our time and one of the world’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Desertification and land degradation are among the greatest environmental challenges of our time and a threat to food security, livelihoods and health of hundreds of millions of people. Drylands cover over 30% of the Earth’s land and are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation, inappropriate land use and climate variability.

Political instability, deforestation, overgrazing and bad irrigation practices can all contribute to desertification, which UNCCD describes as “a silent, invisible crisis that is destabilizing communities on a global scale.” Droughts kill more people than any other weather-related catastrophe and can amplify tensions within and between communities. It is estimated that 135 million people are at risk of being displaced by desertification, and drylands are the most conflict-prone regions of the world.

Climate change, and the increasingly unpredictable and extreme weather in arid lands, makes combating desertification even more vital. Restoring degraded land can help it to withstand the impacts of climate change, and has the potential to store up to 3 billion tonnes of carbon annually. Securing healthy and productive land is the key to allowing communities everywhere to not just survive but thrive.

 

Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi

 

Photo credit: XinhuaNet

Liu Jieyi (C, front), China’s permanent representative to the United Nations, addresses a workshop at the UN headquarters, May 26, 2017. A project promoted by China-UN Peace and Development Trust Fund was launched on Friday at the UN headquarters in a bid to help developing countries reduce hunger and explore renewable energy. The project named Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi by using wild grasses and herbal plants instead of trees or woods. (Xinhua)

Project of China-UN development fund launched at UN headquarters

Source: Xinhua

 

A project promoted by China-UN Peace and Development Trust Fund was launched on Friday at the UN headquarters in a bid to help developing countries reduce hunger and explore renewable energy.

The project named Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi by using wild grasses and herbal plants instead of trees or woods.

At a workshop held here, China’s Ambassador to the UN Liu Jieyi said Juncao Technology is a priority project that the China-UN Fund is promoting, because it fits the needs of countries in Asia and Africa to eradicate poverty and it is a solution contributed by China to help them overcome development challenges.

The Juncao technology is developed based on research conducted by Professor Lin Zhanxi from China’s Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University who invented the Juncao technology in the 1980s.

According to his research, the Juncao grass can develop its root system in deserts and grow fast and therefore it has been used to control soil erosion, desertification or manage saline-alkali soil.

It is also used to produce clean energy. Lin said the power generated from the burning of Juncao grown on one hectare of land is equivalent to that from more than 50 tons of coal but with much less emissions.

Statistics show that in China’s northwestern region of Ningxia which is dry and desert-like, the project has helped lift 17,500 households out of poverty with farmers’ annual income increasing from 80 U.S. dollars in 1998 to 1,024 dollars in 2007.

Read the full article: XinhuaNet