Ooranies to uplift the economic status of the rural people (SCAD)

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Ooranie pond restoration in India, Puliyamarathuarasadi

Fish culture in baby ponds

SCAD’s Newsletter – Vol. 2 – March 2015

Ooranie (Tamil word) = traditional drinking water pond in Tamil Nadu (India)

Fish culture is a profitable venture and in order to uplift the economic status of the rural people of Tuticorin and Tirunelveli districts, SCAD advised the villagers to engage themselves in fish culture, especially in their ooranies.

Restoring ooranies in India, Puliyamarathuarasadi - http://blog.jeevika.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/S1030140.jpg
Restoring ooranies in India, Puliyamarathuarasadi – http://blog.jeevika.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/S1030140.jpg

During the rainy season, SCAD had stocked fish fingerlings in ooranies (which are highly expected to attain one kilogram after 7 to 8 months since the date of stock in the ooranie). In 2014, the number of fingerlings that had been stocked in 15 baby ponds was 55,000. The baby ponds have been dug out with a width and length of 50 feet and depth of 5 feet. SCAD supplied fingerlings to the water committee after which the committee initiated to bring the same to the baby ponds. These villages have efficient water committees who actively engage in deepening work and who are capable of maintaining the baby ponds for the future benefits of the community.

Long-term impact & Sustainability:

The ooranies in which the baby ponds are dug out can store water for 10 months of the year. The income generated from fish cultivation, is deposited in the committee’s name and is used for ongoing maintenance of the baby ponds and ooranies. Due to the increased water capacity the villagers will be able to cultivate fish for longer periods and get a better price.

Read the full text in SCAD’s Newsletter

Social Change And Development (SCAD)

105/A1 North By Pass Road, Vannarpettai, Tirunelveli – 627 003, Tamil Nadu, INDIA
Email: scb_scad@yahoo.com / Web: http://www.scad.org.in

Author: Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.

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