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Trees and climate change

Photo credit: Nature World News

Every autumn between five and eight kilograms of dry, dead leaves fall into Welsh streams for insects to feed on. Then fish, bats and birds are provided with ample, nutritious food in return. (Photo : Flickr: Kimberly Vardeman)

Planting Trees May Boost Riverbed Animals’ Ability To Fight Climate Change, Researchers Say

By Samantha Mathewson

Planting trees along Britain’s 242,334 miles of upland rivers and streams could help save natural environments from future climate change damage, researchers reveal in a new study. This mitigation could also save cool-water species that call these riverbeds home.

Researchers from Cardiff University provide new insight regarding how trees boost the resilience of river ecosystems. Essentially, deciduous trees provide shade and protect river species from damagingly high temperatures. Also, every autumn between five and eight kilograms of dry, dead leaves fall into Welsh streams for insects to feed on. Then, the insects act as a vital food source for fish, river birds and bats. Keeping insect populations high is important for helping river ecosystems combat the effects of future climate change, researchers explained in a news release.

Read the full article: Nature World News

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.