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Know the Australian ‘Resurrection Plants’

Photo credit: Nature World News

Native Australian “resurrection plants” store sugars and recycle cells to survive long dry episodes. Using this, researchers may be able to design drought-resistant crops. (Photo : Wikimedia Commons )

Australian ‘Resurrection Plants’ Shed Light On Ways To Create Drought-Tolerant Crops

By Samantha Mathewson

During periods of drought, a native Australian grass, Tripogon loliiformis, “plays dead” to reserve its energy for when it is later resurrected by water, according to researchers from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). While a few other plants do this too, all of them known as “resurrection plants,” the QUT team notes that this ability may provide genetic keys to designing plants with a tolerance for increasing global temperatures.

“Global climate change, increasingly erratic weather and a burgeoning global population are significant threats to the sustainability of future crop production, but resurrection plants present great potential for the development of stress tolerant crops,” Dr. Brett Williams, one of the study researchers from the QUT, said in a news release, adding that their findings could be applied to world food crops such as chickpeas.

Read the full article: Nature World News

 

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.