Various ways to conserve forests – while making an income from the indigenous communities in Peru

 

Forests in the Peruvian Amazon stand for far more than just tree cover for these indigenous communities.   Marco Simola  CIFOR

Photo credit: CIFOR

Forests in the Peruvian Amazon stand for far more than just tree cover for these indigenous communities. Marco Simola CIFOR

REDD+ and other imperfect solutions

Indigenous communities in Peru’s Amazon are trying various ways to conserve forests – while making an income from them too.

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For Carolina Barbarán, leader of an indigenous Shipibo Konibo community near the Ucayali River, protecting local forests is a major concern – because here, in the heart of the Peruvian Amazon, the future of forests is the future of the people.

“A big threat comes from illegal loggers who steal our timber,” says Barbarán, as she enumerates the challenges she and her community face.

“They can sneak in because the managed forest is too far from the village for us to monitor closely.”

Such illegal activity undermines not only the local environment but also the local economy, which depends on forests and forest products.

Which is why villagers and supporting organizations are always looking for new approaches for conserving the forests and increasing their incomes – including the mechanism known as REDD+, or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation.

RESEACHING REDD+

Since 2012, Barbarán’s community has been involved in a REDD+ project led by the non-profit Association for Research and Integral Development (Asociación para la Investigación y el Desarrollo Integral, AIDER).

The basic idea of REDD+ is to place a monetary value on the carbon emissions that are saved through avoided deforestation.

Read the full article: Forest News CIFOR

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.