https://images.sciencedaily.com/2016/04/160408132503_1_540x360.jpg

How ancient civilizations used and conserved water.

 

 

Photo credit : Science Daily

This is the base of an excavated depression showing evidence of limestone quarrying for building material.
Credit: Jeff Brewer

How an ancient civilization conserved water

Source: University of Cincinnati

Summary:

High-resolution, aerial imagery bears significance for researchers on the ground investigating how remote, ancient Maya civilizations used and conserved water.

Collection, storage and management of water were top priorities for the ancient Maya, whose sites in Mexico, Belize and Guatemala were forced to endure seven months out of the year with very little rainfall. As researchers expand their explorations of the civilization outside of large, elite-focused research site centers, aerial imagery technology is helping them locate and study areas that are showing them how less urbanized populations conserved water for drinking and irrigation. The NSF-supported research by Jeffrey Brewer, a doctoral student in the University of Cincinnati’s Department of Geography, and Christopher Carr, a UC research assistant professor of geography, was presented at the 81st annual meeting of the Society of American Archaeology.

The UC researchers used a surveying technology called LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) — along with excavation data — to examine the spatial characteristics, cultural modifications and function of residential-scale water tanks — a little-investigated component of Maya water management by commoners versus the more powerful and visible elites, says Brewer.

LiDAR is a remote sensing technology that collects high-resolution imagery shot from an airplane at 30,000 points per second, allowing researchers to map ground surfaces through dense vegetation. The technology saves a significant amount of time in the field, compared with trekking through forests to locate these small depressions at ground level.

Read the full story : Science Daily

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.