http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2016/05/water-from-fog.png.662x0_q70_crop-scale.png

‘Atrapanieblas’ to capture condensation (Cloud Catchers)

 

Photo credit: Treehugger

Video screen capture Makeshift

Peruvian farmers harvest water from fog

by Sami Grover

Sami Grover

If you live halfway up a mountain in rural Peru, and if you have no access to running water, farming can be a difficult task. In a town called Villa Lourdes, villagers receive deliveries of fresh drinking water three times a week from Lima—and they used to have to schlep a good deal of that water up the hill to irrigate their crops. That’s until a different, all together more elegant solution presented itself:

Fog.

Using ‘Atrapanieblas’—large nets erected on the hillside—farmers like Maria Teresa Avalos Cucho take advantage of the daily fog to capture condensation, harvesting between 200 and 400 liters a day from each panel—which is then stored in tanks, and gravity-fed to the crops below.

Read the full article: Treehugger  

Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.