Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi

 

Photo credit: XinhuaNet

Liu Jieyi (C, front), China’s permanent representative to the United Nations, addresses a workshop at the UN headquarters, May 26, 2017. A project promoted by China-UN Peace and Development Trust Fund was launched on Friday at the UN headquarters in a bid to help developing countries reduce hunger and explore renewable energy. The project named Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi by using wild grasses and herbal plants instead of trees or woods. (Xinhua)

Project of China-UN development fund launched at UN headquarters

Source: Xinhua

 

A project promoted by China-UN Peace and Development Trust Fund was launched on Friday at the UN headquarters in a bid to help developing countries reduce hunger and explore renewable energy.

The project named Juncao Technology provides with an agricultural technology to cultivate edible and medicinal fungi by using wild grasses and herbal plants instead of trees or woods.

At a workshop held here, China’s Ambassador to the UN Liu Jieyi said Juncao Technology is a priority project that the China-UN Fund is promoting, because it fits the needs of countries in Asia and Africa to eradicate poverty and it is a solution contributed by China to help them overcome development challenges.

The Juncao technology is developed based on research conducted by Professor Lin Zhanxi from China’s Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University who invented the Juncao technology in the 1980s.

According to his research, the Juncao grass can develop its root system in deserts and grow fast and therefore it has been used to control soil erosion, desertification or manage saline-alkali soil.

It is also used to produce clean energy. Lin said the power generated from the burning of Juncao grown on one hectare of land is equivalent to that from more than 50 tons of coal but with much less emissions.

Statistics show that in China’s northwestern region of Ningxia which is dry and desert-like, the project has helped lift 17,500 households out of poverty with farmers’ annual income increasing from 80 U.S. dollars in 1998 to 1,024 dollars in 2007.

Read the full article: XinhuaNet

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.