Incredible story of the Great Green Wall which will stretch across Africa – and help millions

EXCLUSIVE: British charity Tree Aid work across Ghana, Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso and Ethiopia to grow trees across the drylands of Africa in support of the Great Green Wall campaign

ByRhian Lubin
14 NOV 2019
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/we-worry-lot-children-future-20883477

Homes and farmlands destroyed by floods and desertification paint a grim picture of how the climate crisis has gripped countries like Ghana.

But there is a possible solution that is already helping communities on the climate front lines in Africa to thrive. Trees. . . and lots of them.

The Great Green Wall Sahara and Sahel Initiative is an African-led movement of 21 countries with the epic ambition to grow an 8,000km natural wonder, spanning from Senegal in the west to Somalia in the east.

It could be the lifeline the continent – and the planet – needs for future generations to survive the changes the climate crisis will bring.

Local women prepare to plant trees in Yendi along the Daka River, Ghana (Image: Rowan Griffiths)

By 2030 the hope is the Great Green Wall will be the largest living structure on the planet, three times the size of the Great Barrier Reef.

We joined British charity Tree Aid, who work across five of the 21 countries – Ghana, Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso and Ethiopia.

We saw the vital work they do, partnered with the UN Convention to Combat Desertification, to grow trees across the drylands of Africa in support of the Great Green Wall campaign.

The British charity ‘Tree Aid’ is helping local people near Yendi to protect their longterm futures by planting thousands of trees (Image: Rowan Griffiths/Daily Mirror)
By 2030 the hope is the Great Green Wall will be the largest living structure on the planet (Image: Rowan Griffiths/Daily Mirror)
Some of the trees planted (Image: Rowan Griffiths/Daily Mirror)
Rhian planted her own Cassia tree with the help of local woman Sena Wumbei (Image: Rowan Griffiths/Daily Mirror)
Robert Atawura talks to Mirror writer Rhian about the importance of trees (Image: Rowan Griffiths)
Tree Aid’s project along the Daka River is helping to plant over 200,000 trees and regenerating 125,000 trees with local communities (Image: Rowan Griffiths/Daily Mirror)

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Author: Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.