How to FERTILIZE DRY AND BARREN SOIL IN AGRICULTURE

 

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Fruitful curly red chili trees on fine soil. Photo by: http://www.hallogarden.comhttp://www.hallogarden.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/FB_IMG_14866445679861.jpg

4 WAYS TO FERTILIZE DRY AND BARREN SOIL IN AGRICULTURE

http://www.hallogarden.com/2017/02/4-ways-fertilize-dry-barren-soil-agriculture/

Soil is a media most frequently used by farmers to plant various types of crops. However, there are other kinds of farming that doesn’t use as their media for example hydroponic farming, aquaponics farming, etc.

In soil, we can find a lot of important nutrients to protect so they can be beneficial for plants around the area. Most of the times, dry, barren soil tend to get left as it is, dry and barren. This causes the nutrients in it to diminish due to the lack of proper care and optimized use. So, if you find land around you with dry and barren soil, it is best for you to optimize it by planting various vegetables and fruits and making your own garden.

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Green manure cover crops and agroforestry

 

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COMACO Gliricidia/maize intercropping field. Photo credit: Christian Thierfelder/CIMMYT.

Addressing smallholder farmers’ needs with green manure cover crops and agroforestry in Zambia

 

Read the full story: Africa Rising

The impact of soil management

 

Photo credit: CIAT

Seeing is believing: the impact of soil management

by

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, two trials, established in 2003, are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya.

What these trials allow us to do is show-case changes in soil fertility and health – for example the impact of conservation measures like minimum tillage, manure application or green manure cover cropping – on soil fertility and crop yields, and what happens if these are absent.

They also enable us to show the impact of cropping systems and rotations, providing farmers with advice about which mix of organic and mineral fertilizers can restore productivity to degraded soils, for example. These are not quick-fixes: they take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trials.

Over the years, the trials have been visited by hundreds of farmers, regional stakeholders, and students studying agronomy and soil health practices. They also provide a platform for students to pursue their BSc, MSc or PhD studies, and to dig into some of the fascinating aspects of soil biology and biodiversity.

Read the full story: CIAT

A vital role for seaweed in fertilizing acres of abandoned farmland

Photo credit: Google

Jason Tanner, SARDI researcher at O’Sullivan’s Beach. Jason wants to set up a seaweed farm in South Australia. Picture: Sarah Reed Source: AAP

Ancient forms of agriculture could aid remote farming communities

British Ecological Society (BES)

Huge piles are accumulating on beaches all over the Caribbean. - http://lh5.ggpht.com/-Ykmq0s7FTao/VNd3XmfftmI/AAAAAAAAEp0/ezgTvZSb40k/Seaweed_Xpu-Ha1_thumb%25255B2%25255D.jpg?imgmax=800
Huge piles are accumulating on beaches all over the Caribbean. – http://lh5.ggpht.com/-Ykmq0s7FTao/VNd3XmfftmI/AAAAAAAAEp0/ezgTvZSb40k/Seaweed_Xpu-Ha1_thumb%25255B2%25255D.jpg?imgmax=800

Tossed up onto Scottish beaches by the tonne, seaweed is finding a place at the table thanks to the fashion for foraged food. But it could also play a vital role in returning acres of abandoned farmland in Scotland to production, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society’s annual meeting in Edinburgh this week.

Ecologists from Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) and the University of Edinburgh have been studying some of the UK’s remotest farming communities — the talamh dubh or ‘black land’ crofts on the east coast of North Uist.

Parallel ridges on hill sides here are remnants of old agricultural systems that the ecologists believe could be used to increase productivity on land now largely unused.

Crofting counties of the North West Highlands and Islands of Scotland make up 16% of land in the UK. Today, 375,000 people and five million sheep live there, yet the area imports 95% of its food. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, however, the area was home to over half a million people and was 90% self-sufficient in food.

To find out how best to return some of this land to production, the researchers combined modern science with traditional detective work, collecting community memories and Gaelic words, and poring over historical documents and old photographs.

According to lead author Dr Barbra Harvie of SRUC: “Most of this agricultural land has lain abandoned for more than 60 years and local knowledge of how to manage it is rapidly disappearing. By interviewing crofters, we are gleaning vital knowledge before it is lost forever.”

The studies also involve some hard graft, she says: “After researching historical crop rotations we have replicated these in the field by hand-digging ridges and hauling seaweed from the coast.”

Read the full article: Science Daily

Introducing new farming practices for carbon sink

Photo credit: SciDevNet – http://www.scidev.net/objects_store/thumbnail/3C07DFC259BE3DE0EA49FB9FABB57F9F.jpg

Copyright: Dieter Telemans/Panos

 

Soil project seeks to soak up excess carbon

by Tania Rabesandratana

“It’s a bit of a scientific dream, but we have a lot of evidence that supports this dream.” Jean-Paul Moatti, French Research Institute for Development

Speed read

  • 4 Pour 1000 initiative aims to lock away carbon through better farming
  • It encourages simple steps such as tree planting and adding manure
  • Project hopes to do enough to offset all human emissions

France is leading a worldwide push to increase the amount of carbon locked in soils through better farming practices.

Supporters of an initiative launched at the COP 21 summit say this would limit global warming by removing carbon from the atmosphere, while also increasing the range and amount of food farmers produce by improving soil fertility. This would particularly benefit developing countries, according to representatives of the 4 Pour 1000 initiative.

“It’s a bit of a scientific dream, but we have a lot of evidence that supports this dream,” Jean-Paul Moatti, the chief executive officer of the French Research Institute for Development, one of the organisations behind the plan, said yesterday on the sidelines of the talks in Paris, France.

Increasing carbon stocks in the top 40 centimetres of soil by four parts per 1,000 (0.4 per cent) each year would compensate for carbon emissions from human activity, the project description says, provided deforestation is halted.

Read the full article: SciDevNet

Inoculated Rhizobia bacteria to increase legume yields

Photo credit: SciDevNet

Copyright: Sven Torfinn/Panos

 

Nitrogen-fixing tech aiding legume yields in Zimbabwe

Speed read

  • Smallholders are unable to afford fertilisers to increase crop yields
  • In Zimbabwe, use of low-cost fertiliser tech is increasing legume yields
  • At least 60,000 smallholders are using the technology

A low-cost nitrogen fixing technology for legume crops is being given to small-scale farmers in Zimbabwe to improve national food and nutrition security.

The Chemistry and Soil Research Institute in Zimbabwe is distributing sachets that contain inoculated Rhizobia bacteria — a technique for adding bacteria to a carrier medium to improve biological nitrogen fixation — to farmers for increased yields and affordable organic fertilisers.

Emmanuel Chikwari, head of the institute, which is under the Ministry of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development, says this process is useful for meeting the nitrogen requirements of legume plants.

“This is a promising technology in the production of legume crops,” says Chikwari. “The inoculants can be added to the seed before planting.”

Nitrogen, he explains, is essential for photosynthesis, a process whereby plants make their own food in the presence of water, sunshine and carbon dioxide for vigorous growth and increased yields.

Read the full article: SciDevNet

Rain water harvesting in barrels, compost tea, drip irrigation

 

 

660 Gallon Rain Barrel & Compost Tea System

This is the last video in my rain barrel system series. The entire system has now been constructed and consists of 12-55 gallon drums to hold 660 gallons of rain water. Four additional containers are below the barrels which will brew compost tea – and then it is pumped back into the rain water barrels to make a 1 part compost tea – to 3 parts water mixture to be delivered to the garden.

https://youtu.be/iYmjJCFzYMg

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RAIN WATER HARVESTING PART II

IN ADDITION TO MY FIRST VIDEO, I DID ONE MORE, THIS WILL COLLECT 825 GALLONS OF WATER THAT I WILL USE TO WATER MY TREES AND OTHER PLANTS, THAT WAY I DON’T TOUCH ANY WATER FROM THE CITY
” FOR PLANTS ONLY ”

https://youtu.be/miiyG-LaKFc

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rain water catchment

https://youtu.be/oGF3hFRZkr8