Communicating international development research (id21): Water

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

WATER

1. The value of rainfed agriculture in a world short of water.
2. Efficient water use tackles food insecurity.
3. Managing groundwater for dry season irrigation.
4. Water access in Ethiopia: can conflict be avoided?
5. Women and water in Sierra Leone.
6. Community priorities for water rights.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating international development research (id21): Water”

Communicating international development research (id21): Rural livelihoods

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

RURAL LIVELIHOODS

1. Understanding rural telephone use.
2. Overcoming rural-urban divides.
3. Improving rural road networks.
4. The Mekong region’s rural water market
5. Networks to maintain crop diversity.
6. Reducing indoor air pollution.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating international development research (id21): Rural livelihoods”

Communicating international development research (id21): Land

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

LAND

1. Privatising common land in Botswana.
2. Land disputes in Ghana.
3. Women and land rights in India.
4. Why do the Maasai split up group ranches?
5. Evaluating land policies in highland Ethiopia.
6. Agrarian reform and rural poverty in South Africa.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating international development research (id21): Land”

Communicating international development research (id21): Forestry

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

FORESTRY

1. Tribal rights and conservation practice in India’s forests.
2. Does the privatisation help poor people?
3. Forest trade in the Asia-Pacific region.
4. Community forestry in Nepal: are poor people winners or losers.
5. Supporting community forest management in Lao PDR.
6. From poachers to tour guides: a forest management story.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating international development research (id21): Forestry”

Communicating !nternational development research (id21): Conservation

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

CONSERVATION

1. Managing the bushmeat trade in Ghana.
2. Environmental management and the MDGs
3. Ecosystem conservation for economic development.
4. Using community conservation to achieve the MDGs.
5. Protecting the marine environment in the Vietnam Sea.
6. Payments for environmental services.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating !nternational development research (id21): Conservation”

Communicating international development research (id21): Agriculture

Natural Resource Highlights” are published annually by id21, which is hosted by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) of the University of Sussex in Brighton, BN1 9RE (UK). It is supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

id21 publishes these highlights on agriculture, conservation, fisheries, forestry, land, rural livelihoods and water. On the website http://www.id21.org/nr you will find the full range of over 2000 research highlights.

I read the 2006 issues on all the above fields of interest and found very interesting contributions:

AGRICULTURE

1. Can targeting family farms help to reduce poverty?
2. Agricultural extension: prioritising farmer’s needs.
3. Maize farming in Kenya.
4. Debating biotechnology in southern Africa.
5. Are fertiliser subsidies right for Africa?
6. Balancing indigenous crops and market demands in the Andes.

A number of useful websites are mentioned. These offer new possibilities for collecting information:

Continue reading “Communicating international development research (id21): Agriculture”

Vegetables for your garden

A pingback for my desertification blog message “Get kids gardening to combat desertification” brought me to another nice blog called:
My Gardening Home
through which I found a reference to an interesting book of Jack STAUB “75 Exciting Vegetables For Your Garden“. Find more info at:

http://blog.mygardeninghome.com/vegetables-for-your-garden/

Strongly recommended !

Exciting book on desertification

Interested in books on desertification? Please go to:

http://www.wageningenacademic.com/desertification/

You will find info on a book from Wageningen Academic Publishers called:

Unraveling desertification
Policies and actor networks in Southern Europe
Edited by G.A.Wilson and M. Juntti
2005, 248 pages, hardcover

This book analyses processes of desertification from a social science perspective and unravels the policy related drivers of desertification. Desertification is addressed both as a concept surrounded by a multitude of different discourses and as a tangible unsustainable process that is connected to a complex set of policies and changing land management practices. The focus will be on Southern Europe, where desertification has been a long-standing problem in many areas, and where in some places the loss of productive capacity has worsened considerably over the last few decades. By focusing on four specific case study areas in Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece, the scope of the book will cover the ‘human dimension’ of desertification, exploring in particular how the framework of existing policies has affected land management decisions and desertification processes.The emphasis will be on how policies may have contributed to desertification alleviation and mitigation, as well as to a worsening of desertification processes. By using an actor-network approach, the book specifically investigates the importance of networks of actors that shape the nature and direction of policies that affect desertification processes. In this sense, this book aims at providing a first glance into the complex policy, economic and socio-cultural networks that operate at the local, regional and national levels in areas of Southern Europe affected by desertification, and to analyse how these networks hinder, or promote, the implementation of policies aimed at alleviating the threat of desertification.With its broad remit, this exciting book will appeal to many different audiences, not only including academics and students of various disciplines (including, for example, geography, environmental management, environmental sciences, agricultural sciences, policy studies, environmental politics, etc.), but also practitioners at the local, regional (Mediterranean) and international (e.g. EU) spatial levels in a variety of fields such as environmental and agricultural policy-making, agricultural extension services, farming organisations, environmental NGOs, media representatives and many other environmental stakeholder groups.“.

ISBN-10:
90-76998-42-6
ISBN-13:
978-90-76998-42-8
price (€):49
price ($):58

How to get drinking water clean without chlorine?

This morning I received the following interesting message :

Science Daily — University of Delaware researchers have developed an inexpensive, nonchlorine-based technology that can remove harmful microorganisms, including viruses, from drinking water.


Pei Chiu, an associate professor in UD’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (UD = University of Delaware, USA), and Yan Jin, a professor of environmental soil physics in UD’s plant and soil sciences department, have developed an inexpensive, nonchlorine-based technology that can remove harmful microorganisms from drinking water, including viruses. UD’s patented technology, developed jointly by researchers in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the College of Engineering, incorporates highly reactive iron in the filtering process to deliver a chemical “knock-out punch” to a host of notorious pathogens, from E. coli to rotavirus. The new technology could dramatically improve the safety of drinking water around the globe, particularly in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over a billion people–one-sixth of the world’s population–lack access to safe water supplies. Four billion cases of diarrheal disease occur worldwide every year, resulting in 1.8 million deaths, primarily infants and children in developing countries. Eighty-eight percent of this disease is attributed to unsafe water supplies, inadequate sanitation and hygiene.

Continue reading “How to get drinking water clean without chlorine?”

Où restent mes images?

Depuis quelques semaines, je ne publie plus des images sur les cas de succès de nos projets dans la lutte contre la désertification. Pourquoi? Simplement par ce que j’ai toujours le même problème : je peux charger mes images, mais je n’arrive pas à passer les images chargées à l’éditeur de WordPress.

J’ai cherché à trouver une solution, mais apparemment d’autres personnes rencontrent les mêmes problèmes.

Est-ce que WordPress ne peut pas résoudre ce problème? Je l’espère. Entre-temps, restez patients, car j’ai beaucoup de belles choses à vous montrer!

What about my desertification pictures?

For some weeks now, I am not publishing pictures about our successful projects in the combat of desertification anymore. Why? Well, simply because I encounter always the same difficulty : upload of pictures works, but sending the uploaded picture to the editor of WordPress fails.

I have been checking to find a solution, but seemingly other people encounter the same problem.

Could WordPress solve this problem? I hope it. Meanwhile, stay patient, because I have some splendid things to show!

Get kids gardening to combat desertification

RESUME FRANCAIS

Great Big Plants a décrit l’importance d’intéresser les jeunes au jardinage. Jenny Litchfield nous décrit son plaisir de “travailler” avec son petit-enfant dans son jardin. De mon côté, je souligne le rôle intéressant des “jardins scolaires” pour les élèves et l’importance de tels jardins dans la lutte contre la désertification. Tout en espérant que l’exemple de l’UNICEF ALGERIE, qui a lancé un projet “Ecoles, Amies des Enfants” – avec création de jardins scolaires – sera bientôt suivi dans beaucoup de pays.

————————–

On February 27, 2007, I posted the message “Getting Kids Involved With Gardening” by Great Big Plants (Hans STROCK
Address: 4405 South Litchfield Road
Avondale, AZ 85323 – USA
Telephone: 001-877-4BIOSCI
Email: Info@GreatBigPlants.com

Today, Jenny Litchfield sends me her comment:

I couldn’t agree more. Start early before children go to school. We do nothing special – though I believe it’s important that children acquire language of gardening. Wonderful conversations happen with our 23-month old grandson who eats the peas or cherry tomatoes as he picks them but won’t eat them if they’re cooked at dinnertime. We and his father talk about anything we see while we walkabout or work in the garden – so a conversation in effect, becomes a story about a bumblebee or a white butterfly or a wriggly worm. He can say some colours and names of some plants and garden tools during the daily garden activities – he uses a real trowel and watering can – which is particularly good for watering Daddy. The garden learning experiences are authentic and must be fun. I have observed he mimics our actions so it is important the adults work safely in front of children. Other activities he likes are: smelling, tasting and listening. I’ll crush a few leaves in my hand and we’ll smell and taste herbs and vegetables. We sniff the flowers. We listen to the breeze rustle the leaves or to the buzz of the bees. We take photos of him in the garden and he loves seeing himself on the computer in the downloaded photos, which I caption, and read like a story – he fills in the gaps. He features from time to time when I write about my garden.“.

It’s nice to hear that parents (and grandparents!) are motivating kids to participate in some gardening activities. Thanks, Jenny, for showing your enthusiasm about spending some time with the children in the garden (and not only to play!). Almost all the children are very eager to learn about nature, plants and animals. And our gardens are a part of nature.

My main action fields are the drylands of this world. I spend a lot of time in combating desertification on all continents. Generally, we work with adults, in particular with women, because they are almost always responsible for fieldwork (agriculture) or gardening (horticulture). Therefore, we have been setting up “community gardens” for the women of one village, or “family gardens” for every family in one village, or “school gardens” for the children in one village.

Continue reading “Get kids gardening to combat desertification”

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