A climate resilience initiative for sustainable development

 

Photo credit: FAO

An FAO-supported climate-smart agriculture initiative in Tanzania.

UN Secretary General’s climate resilience initiative set to mobilize and accelerate climate action for sustainable development

Anticipate, Absorb, Reshape leadership group launched during UN general assembly

Partners of a new UN-led platform to mobilize and accelerate action on climate resilience agreed today to move ahead with plans that will help meet the needs of a growing global population that is being impacted by climate change.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Initiative on Climate Resilience, known as A2R (Anticipate, Absorb, Reshape), was launched by world leaders during the Paris Climate Conference last year.

The A2R Leadership Group comprises Germany, Egypt, Morocco, Samoa, the World Bank, the Rockefeller Foundation’s Global Resilience Partnership; Bangladesh based philanthropic Bank BRAC, Insurance Development Forum (IDF), Red Cross and Red Crescent Climate Center, Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy, the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and UN Environment. The Leadership Group is charged with implementing the transformational vision embedded in the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Sustainable Development Goals through an unprecedented global multistakeholder partnership.

It will catalyze climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction efforts to support people in addressing the challenge of climate change, contributing to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Read the full article: FAO

How an ancient crop teams up with a beneficial microbe to protect against a devastating fungal infection

 

Photo credit: Science Daily

Finger millet field.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Guelph

New discovery may benefit farmers worldwide

Date:
September 26, 2016
Source:
University of Guelph
Summary:
Plant scientists have shown for the first time how an ancient crop teams up with a beneficial microbe to protect against a devastating fungal infection, a discovery that may benefit millions of subsistence farmers and livestock in developing countries.

Read the full article: Science Daily

To achieve food and nutrition security for all and to help address global challenges.

 

Photo credit: FAO

Farmers harvesting rice fields, Laos.

Transforming agriculture to address climate change and other global challenges

FAO’s Committee on Agriculture focuses on innovation to achieve food security and sustainable development

The agricultural sector must transform itself not only to achieve food and nutrition security for all, but also to help address global challenges such as climate change and antimicrobial resistance, FAO Director- General José Graziano da Silva said today.

In a speech to ministers, government, private sector and civil society representatives attending the biannual meeting of FAO’s Committee on Agriculture (COAG, 26-30 September), the Director-General noted how “agriculture is at the very heart” of a recent series of ground-breaking international agreements, including the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

“Sustainable agriculture is paramount to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, to sustain natural resources, to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change, to achieve healthier food systems and to build resilience against crises and natural disasters,” Graziano da Silva said.

But he noted that while past developments in agriculture have led to major improvements in productivity, “progress has been uneven” and that “greater emphasis must be placed on the social and environmental dimensions of sustainability”.

Read the full article: FAO

IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 36

 

agriculture-food-and-nutrition-for-africa

Agriculture, food and nutrition for Africa (FAO 1997)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 36

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1k9HOxwdFv-awCjpq1_QTGskYLYWV8V0NY5623Ob4G1g/edit?usp=sharing

or see agriculture-food-and-nutrition-for-africa-fao-1997

IN MY DESERTIFICATION LIBRARY: BOOK NR. 35

 

prospects-of-saline-agriculture-in-the-arabian-peninsula

 

Prospects of Saline Agriculture in the Arabian Peninsula (2004)

Posted by Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University – Belgium

Having participated in all the meetings of the INCD (1992-1994) and all the meetings of the UNCCD-COP, the CST and the CRIC in 1994-2006, I had an opportunity to collect a lot of interesting books and publications on drought and desertification published in that period.

Book Nr. 35

Please click: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1C1vPXJXOwVBcEhZxO2vO1IZk22CxOjwQFYf16ulG-6w/edit?usp=sharing

or see prospects-of-saline-agriculture-in-the-arabian-peninsula-2004

Smallholder farmers and sustainable agricultural technologies

 

 

Boost for Africa’s smallholder farmers’ access to sustainable agricultural technologies as USAID announces $ 50 million Africa RISING Phase 2

by

The U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Bureau for Food Security in Washington DC has announced funding for a second 5-year phase of the Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING) program beginning October 2016. Funded through the agency’s Feed the Future initiative the second phase of Africa RISING will focus on ensuring farming communities within target feed the future zones of influence in Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania, Ghana and Mali get access to the best-bet/best-fit improved farming practices identified by the project’s research team during the first phase of the project.

“Farmers need access to improved agricultural technologies that have gone through an iterative research process to establish suitability and quality if they are to sustainably optimize the productivity of their farms in a way that lets them benefit from existing and future markets and add value to their crops and herds. This is the goal we aim to achieve through programs like Africa RISING that will now in this new phase have significant focus on ensuring farmers get their hands on improved technologies that have gone through this process,” said Jerry Glover, the USAID Bureau for Food Security’s Senior Sustainable Agriculture Advisor.

The goal of the Africa RISING program is to create opportunities for smallholder  farm households to move out of hunger and poverty through sustainably intensified farming systems that improve food, nutrition, and income security, particularly for women and children, and conserve or enhance the natural resource base. The program which brings together over 100 research and development organizations teaming up to achieve this goal is led by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (in West Africa and East and Southern Africa) and the International Livestock Research Institute (in the Ethiopian Highlands). The International Food Policy Research Institute leads the evaluation and impact assessment.

Read the full article: Africa Rising

Fostering food and nutrition security is key to sustainable development

 

 

Food and nutrition security key to Africa’s development

by Gilbert Nakweya bb9e69386f2d71ee1687c3e38927b131

Fostering food and nutrition security is key to sustainable development. But access to high quality seeds from research and development by smallholder farmers is still a major challenge to agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

In fact, the second goal in the UN’s Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development Goal is to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

But how much is Africa investing to improve food security? Is Africa committed to taking leadership in building resilient seed sector for improved food security? Th

Africa requires a continental effort in development of sustainable seed sector through leadership.

Gilbert Nakweya

ese were some of the issues I pondered over during the Integrated Seed Sector Development (ISSD) Africa Synthesis Conference in Kenya this week (19-20 September). The conference drew agricultural experts from all over the world to discuss the findings of ISSD Africa’s two year pilot project that ends this year.

Read the full article: SciDevNet